Top 41 Acid-Loving Plants (A to Z list)

Acid-loving-plant_Hydrangea

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Do you know that a small number of plants need to grow in highly acidic soil because they have a higher requirement of certain nutrients that are most available in low pH environments?

While most plants thrive in slightly acidic or near-neutral soil, a small number of herb, vegetable, ornamental flowers, shrub and trees, actually need to grow in highly acidic soil with a 4.5 to 5.5 pH. 

In this article, we put together such a list of 41 popular acid-loving plants that can be grown in very acidic soil (pH 4.5 – 6), or Ericaceous soil, and in soil that is near neutral (pH 6 – 7).

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Quick Summary

These are the plants that need highly acidic soil (pH 4.5-5.5).

Herb  Lingonberry
Turmeric
Vegetable  Potatoes
Sweet potatoes
Fruits  Apple
Blueberry
Cranberry
Elderberry
Huckleberry
Raspberry
Flower  African violets
Begonia
Christmas cactus
Ferns
Japanese iris
Pachysandra
Wintergreen
Shrub  Azalea
Bayberry
Bittersweet
Fringe tree
Gardenia
Heather (summer-flowering)
Hydrangea
Rhododendron
Serviceberry
Sumac
Viburnum, maple-leaved
Trees  Acer
Beech, American
Birch
Crabapple
Fir
Hemlock
Holly
Juniper
Magnolia
Oak
Spruce
Pine
Weeping willow

What affects the pH preferences of plants? Genetics.

Different species of plants from the same family can result in different pH preferences. 

For example, both Fraser fir and Balsam fir trees prefer a highly acidic 4.5-5 pH and 5-6 pH environment respectively, while Douglas fir trees prefer a less acidic environment of 6-7 pH. 

The same goes with double-file viburnum (6.5-7.5 pH) and maple-leaved viburnum (4-5 pH) which have different pH requirements.

1. Herbs

Most herbs require only slightly acidic soil. 

pH 4-5 
Lingonberry4.3-5.5
Turmeric4.5-7.5
  
pH 6-7 
Basil6.7.5
Chives6-7
Crocus6-7
Dill6.5-7
Fennel6.5-8
Fringed bleeding heart6-6.5
Garlic6-7 ok
Iris6.8-7
Lemongrass6.5-7
Oregano6.5-7
Parsley6-7 ok
Rosemary6-7 ok
Sage5.5-6.5
Spearmint6.5-7
Thyme6.5-8

2. Vegetable and crops

The majority of vegetables require only slightly acidic soil, with potatoes and sweet potatoes as the few exceptions. 

Rhubarb is quite unique in its soil pH preference as it can grow in highly acidic, neutral as well as alkaline soil, as long as it is well drained.

pH4.5-5.9 
Potatoes4.8-6.5
Sweet potatoes5.2-6
  
ph6-7 
Asparagus6-8
Beans6-7
Beets6.5-8
Broccoli6-7
Cabbage6-7.5
Carrots5.5-7
Cauliflower6-7
Cantaloupe6-7.5
Corn5.5-7.5
Cucumbers5.5-7
Eggplant5.5-6.5
Celery5.8-6.8
Cucumber6-6.5
Turnip6-7.5
Lettuce6-6.5
Onion6-7
Parsnip6-7
Peas6-7.5
Peppers, sweet or hot6-7 ok
Potato4.8-6.5
Pumpkin and winter squash (and vine crops)6-6.5
Radish6-7
Rhubarb5.5-7
Spinach6-7.5
Squash6-7
Sweet corn5.8-7
Tomato5.5-7

3. Fruits

Most fruits require only slightly acidic soil, with apple and berries as the exception in preferring highly acidic soil.

pH4.5-5.9 
Apple5.5-6
Blueberry4.5-5.5
Cranberry4.2-5.5
Elderberry5.5-6.5
Huckleberry4-5.5
Raspberry5.6-6.2
  
ph6-7 
Cherry, sweet6.5-8
Thimbleberry6-7
Gooseberry6-7
Grapes5.5-7
Pear, common6.5-7.5
Plum, American6.5-8.5
Raspberry, black5.5-7
Raspberry, red6-7.5
Red cloverAt least 6.5
Strawberry5.5-6.5

4. Flowers

Many flowers require highly acidic soil, including houseplants such as African violets.

Flowers 
pH4.5-5.9 
African violets5.8-6.2
Japanese Iris5.5-6.5
Begonia5.5-6.5
Wintergreen5.5-6.5
Pachysandra5.5-6.5
Ferns4-7
  
ph6-7 
Amaryllis6-6.5
Bluegrass, annual6.5-7.5
Bugleweed, carpet6.5-8
Caladium6-6.5
Daffodil6-7
Fescue6-7
Nasturtium6.5-7.5
Red cloverAt least 6.5
Spurge, Japanese6.5-8
Trillium6-6.5

5. Shrubs and Vines

Many shrubs require highly acidic soil, especially most Heather species.

Heather is a small summer-flowering shrub in the Ericaceae family that requires Ericaceous or highly acidic soil.  However, some Heather species, which flower in winter and spring, can thrive in acidic, neutral and even alkaline soil as long as the soil is not too low on Magnesium and is well-draining.  Examples include: Erica vagans (cornish heath), Erica carnea (Mountain heath), Erica erigena (Irish heath), Erica x darleyensis, Erica x griffithsii.

Hydrangeas will display shades of deep blue (pH 4.5), medium blue (pH 5), lavender purple (pH 5.5), purple pink (pH 6), medium pink (pH 6.5) and deep pink (pH 7).  This is because the blue-colored mineral, aluminium, in the soil is most readily available for root uptake at a lower pH.  If the soil goes above pH 6.4, Hydrangeas may even experience iron deficiency.

pH4.5-5.9 
Azalea, native4.5-5.5
Bayberry5-6
Bittersweet, American4.5-6
Fringe tree5-6
Gardenia5-6
Heather (summer-flowering)4.5-5.5
Hydrangeas4.5-6.2
Rhododendron4.5-6
Serviceberry5-6
Sumac5-6
Viburnum, maple-leaved4-5
  
pH6-7 
Barberry, Japanese6-7.5
Beautybush6-7.5
Camellia5.8-6.5
Clematis, Jackman’s5.5-7
Cotoneaster6.5-7.5
Daphne6.5-7.5
Deutzia6-7.5
Dogwood, redtwig6-7
Euonymus, winged5.5-7
Honeysuckle, trumpet6.5-8
Honeysuckle, Tatarian6.5-8
Hydrangea, Peegee6-7
Ivy, Boston6.5-8
Ivy, English6.5-7
Lilac6-7.5
Mockorange6-8
Mountain laurel5.5-7
Rose, hybrid tea5.5-7
Spirea6-7
Viburnum, double file6.5-7.5
Virgin’s bower6.5-7.5
Wayfaring tree5.5-7
Wisteria, Japanese6.5-8

6. Trees

Almost all evergreen trees need to grow in acidic soil, such as pine, beech, willow, oak, dogwood, mountain ash, and magnolias.

pH4.5-5.9 
Acer5-7
Beech, American5-6.5
Birch5-6
Crabapple5-6
Fir, balsam5-6
Fir, fraser4.5-5
Hemlock5-6
Holly4.5-5.5
Juniper5-6
Magnolia, saucer5-6
Oak, pin4.5-5.5
Oak, red4.5-5.5
Oak, white5-6.5
Spruce, Norway5-6
Spruce, white5-6
Pine, white4.5-6
Willow, weeping5-6
  
Ph6-7 
Arborvitae, American6-8
Ash, European mtn.6-7
Hawthorn6-7
Honeylocust6-8
Maidenhair tree6-7
Maple6-7.5
Oak, black6-7
Oak, English6-8
Spruce, Colorado6-7
Yew6-7

Related

Why Do We Need Ericaceous Compost?

Potting Soil vs. Compost: Know the Differences & Uses

References

Almanac. Celery.

Clemson University. Azalea care. College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences Azalea Care.

Colorado State University. Currants, Gooseberries, and Jostaberries.

Heather world.  A Beginner’s Guide to Growing Heathers

Royal Horticultural Society. on Alkaline soil.

University of Minnesota Extension (2018).  Vegetables.

University of Vermont Extension. pH for the garden.

International Camellia Society. Basic camellia care.

Carol loves to garden and research to help others grow their green thumb.

She is working towards her dream of living close to nature.

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